Home / Posts Tagged "Uczciwy handel"

In March 2017 I visited Sao Paulo where I spoke with Natalia Suzuki and Andre Campos of Reporter Brasil, local NGO acting against human rights violations in workplaces with their investigative journalism and research to eradicate slave labour across all sectors. In this eye opening talk we discuss global issues that probably all fashion retailers face when building their supply chain and at the same this conversation will explain to you how migration,human trafficking and discrimination are linked to conventional garment production. What are your actions for Reporter Brazil in garment sector? A.C.: For Reporter Brazil I research supply chains in several economic sectors. I work on projects that help exposing issues like illegal workers, poor working conditions, or even modern slavery and illegal environmental practices across Brazil. After mapping out the connections of poor working conditions to global companies operations we publish our results in many ways – reports, multimedia platforms, etc. For issues related to the garment sector we have a customer friendly form of an app called Moda Livre. It allows Brazilian consumers to find out about what national and international brands are doing to control their supply chains. How well are they informed and what are their policies to monitor and improve their supply chain management regarding human rights. [caption id="attachment_4247" align="aligncenter" width="934"] Reporter Brasil team with the founder Leonardo Sakamoto[/caption] What is the specific of garment sector in Brazil? A.C.: Brazil has a quite big garment industry. The textile and fashion industries together are worth $63bn with annual production of 9.5 million garments (2012). It is also one of the largest employers in the country. However, we don’t export a lot of clothes, as an important share of what's made here is worn by Brazilians. While being domestic oriented, still it’s a relevant, 200 million people market that employs hundreds of thousands of workers. Unfortunately, violations that we see here are not much different from those happening in other garment industry hubs around the world. We have found workshops operating under high pressure of demand and workers bearing a huge hour workload to make the production while receiving a minimal wage. Like in many countries a minimal wage in Brazil is not a living wage. N.S.: Most of the sweatshops are locatedin centre of Sao Paulo, as it is a cheaper neighbourhood, however some of them are now moving out from the city to avoid inspections. Sweatshops were present here already in 70s and 80s and back then they were employing mostly Brazilian women. But since the 90s, migrants from Bolivia, Peru and Paraguay have been become the majority of workforce for garment industry. At first the Korean migrants were in charge of sweatshops, until the beginning of this century when some Latin American workers advanced economically to the point where they started to own some of the sweatshops and recruit people themselves. Still the conditions remain very precarious. How is garment sector relying on migrant workers and where do they come from? N.S.: The process of recruitment is based on a complex, international, semi- formal and semi- legal network. Usually workers are enrolled already in their hometown, in Bolivia for example, often through family relationships. Often they are being lied to about work conditions. First offered good salaries, and later charged excessively for travel and living costs. So newly recruited workers from the day they arrive in Brazil have a huge and unexpected loan to pay back. Living costs that are mentioned here are also estimated by the employer, because majority of migrant workers live inside the sweatshop with their whole family. Another decisive factor that keeps people in this exploitative work relationship is a language barrier. Once they don’t speak Portuguese, they can hardly communicate with people outside their community, also in Bolivia the labour legislation is more permissive than in Brazil. Mentioned factors result in migrant workers being afraid to report their situation, it is even worse if they don’t have a regulated migration status. Unless they register as legal workers in Brazil they will not have the labour legislation in favour of them. Sadly, we often found the cases of employers blackmailing migrant workers who contact authorities. The cases of exploitative working conditions which we find are multifaceted and all the above mentioned conditions make migrant workers particularly vulnerable and feeling that they have nowhere to go or no one to ask for help. A.C.: Out of their downgraded salary migrant workers have to pay for the food and housing expenses provided by the factory owner. We have seen this happening in many places and this kind of situation was also confirmed by inspections from Labour Ministry of Brasil, specialized in detecting modern slavery, that found migrant workers forced to sew garments for most recognizable and profitable brands in the world, including an infamous case of ZARA from 2011. We observe a strong competition between small workshops who want to become a partner of a large retailer in the supply chain. This leads to very low prices. Workshop owners cut the workers benefits to achieve compatible prices. How do you outsource your production to a factory that doesn’t legally exist? N.S.:In theory you can’t. In practice this is happening. Many cases that we found and local labour inspectors were proceeding them, both the sweatshop and the workers operated in black. The most common problem is that a brand is outsourcing to a legally operating factory in Sao Paulo, providing good conditions, but often this factory is subcontracting some of the production to someone else. This includes workshops operating in black or home production. This means that producers are risking their accountability, but consider it to be worthy, to keep up with the market demands. A.C.: Pricing politics is one of the problems. We observe a strong competition between small workshops who want to become a partner of a large retailer in the supply chain. This leads to very low prices. Workshop owners cut the workers benefits to achieve compatible prices. N.S.: The salary depends on the number of pieces that one can produce. That makes people work up to 15-17 hours a day. A.C.: In Reporter Brazil we believe that brands need to have standards for their suppliers. And in some cases they should cut off the business relation with those who don’t assure decent work. When it happens it is important to have policies and training programmes assuring that workers will not be the ones paying price for it. The retailer could find new workplaces in the supply chains for them. Many cases of poor working conditions are usually linked to short term working relations, meaning no longer than a year. These are always people who go from one job to another and lack social security. [caption id="attachment_4271" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Photo by Lilo Clareto from Repórter Brasil[/caption] N.S.: Because the retailer doesn’t hire the garment workers directly and the sweatshop could even possibly employ them in black. Often the sweatshops themselves exist in black and are not able to hire people according to the legislation. When the State authorities audited such places, it is used to find  the lack of documentation, unpayed tax, not respecting workers’ rights, workers living in sweatshops and all these anomalies adding on to one another. Even people really well prepared to inspect the workplace who notice illegal practices such as modern slavery still fail to address them. What are the next steps when such cases are found? A.C.: After the Zara case our team researched what new procedures company has adopted. What did they do to improve their control over the supply chain after such abuse has been found and proved in court. Sadly, although some improvementswere made, we found that they lose control over their supply chain when the outsorced factories subcontracted orders to smaller, non- audited workshops. This is often the case when the order is placed without realistically considering the efficiency and production possibilities of the given factory. Our main idea is to bring it back to work in a regular and correct manner as soon as possible. We think this should be done by making the employer liable for the abuses found which, force the company to pay the debts, social benefits, over hours and lacking salaries back to workers. Sometimes the work continues under new conditions and in other cases the workshop is obliged to be shut down. Workers become unemployed and receive unemployment benefit. We expect an agent representing the brand in Brazil to choose responsibly a place that has financial and legal conditions to employ people with legal wage and full benefits. In your opinion:

READ MORE

Alicja Wysocka, inicjatorka Alfa Omegi działa w nieznanych dla siebie miejscach, próbując przełamać bariery kulturowe i zdobyć zaufanie lokalnej społeczności, aby wspólnie tworzyć. Przeczytajcie historię, która opowiada jak i dlaczego powstały buty w nieformalnych osiedlach w Nairobii i Rio de Janeiro. Skąd wzięła się Twoja nazwa i co oznacza? Zapytano mnie o to jak byłam w Brazylii. Tam dla niektórych było oczywiste, że to odniesienie do Boga, który jest alfą i omegą. Dlatego zaczęłam opowiadać o innym kontekście, czyli Warsztatach Omega. Założyciel grupy, Roger Fry, chciał zatrzeć granicę między sztuką użytkową, a taką przeznaczoną do galerii. Grupa ta wychodziła z założenia, że artyści mogą nie tylko projektować i produkować, ale także sami sprzedawać swoje prace. Podpisane logiem grupy miały zwracać uwagę na sam obiekt, a nie na renomę ich autora. Za sprawą malarki Vanessy Bell, to ubrania stały się głównym źródłem utrzymania grupy. W mojej pracy pozwalam sobie na niedopowiedzenia i nieporozumienia. Nie jestem projektantem, który swoją konkretną wizję realizuje od a do z. Chodzi o to, co wynika ze współpracy osób z różnych kultur i rzeczywistości. Stąd często zamiast rysować projekt, opowiadam o nim. Wówczas osoba, z którą działam ma również wpływ na ostateczny kształt wizualny naszej współpracy. Jeśli nie projektantką, to jak można Cię nazwać? Multidyscyplinarną artystką? Nie lubię nazywać siebie artystką. Ostatnio starszy pan pracujący w administracji w Cepelii, kiedy poszłam tam na research odnośnie spółdzielczości, zapytał czy nie jestem inspiratorką. Bardzo mi się to określenie spodobało. Dla mnie ważne są: proces, doświadczenie i spotkanie. Zawsze miałam problem z autorytetami, kwestionowałam to kogo mamy się słuchać i kto definiuje kto jest autorytetem, a kto nie. Objawiało się to od najmłodszych lat w szkole, czy podczas współpracy z innymi artystami i instytucjami. Tak na marginesie, to marzy mi się rewolucja polskiego systemu szkolnictwa. Dla mnie zdanie i wrażliwość szewca ze slamsu jest tak samo ważne i ciekawe jak zdanie powszechnie uznanego artysty. Chcę żeby ten dialog był równy i dlatego też każdy z twórców był podpisany pod tym projektem.  Świat sztuki działa na takich samych zasadach jak firma - nazwisko artysty działa jak logo. Stworzyłam więc coś na kształt marki, ale gram z jej formą nazywając ją Alfa Omegi, bo nie jest alfą i omegą, a jej działania to często metody prób i błędów. To opowiedz czemu zdecydowałaś się tworzyć akurat ubrania i buty? Ubranie dotyczy nas wszystkich, czy tego chcemy, czy nie - wstajemy rano i musimy się ubrać. Ubiór ma duży wpływ na nasze samopoczucie, ale też to co decydujemy się założyć wynika z tego jak się czujemy. Ubranie wydaje mi się interesujące, bo może być i sztuką wysoką i użyteczną. Angażowanie ludzi do ich produkcji może być też pożyteczne społecznie. Nie potrafię zamknąć się w pracowni i tworzyć abstrakcyjnych światów, choć czasem bardzo bym chciała. Lubię za to reagować na zastaną sytuacje. Ubrania zrobiłyśmy razem z  krawcową, która ma swój warsztat w faweli – slamsie w Rio de Janeiro. Powstały leginsy, koszulki i tuniki. Napisy na ubraniach są wynikiem warsztatów kaligrafii wokół praw człowieka, które przeprowadziłam z dziećmi i młodzieżą w różnych fawelach w Rio de Janeiro. Dla uczestników  warsztatów zrobiłam koszulki z napisami z karty praw człowieka, które wcześniej dzieci wymalowały na kartkach, m.in. Direito a vida – Prawo do życia. Dochód ze sprzedaży ubrań  wspiera te i inne warsztaty edukacyjne w fawelach. Mam nadzieje, że projekt będzie żywy, a krawcowa czeka na dalsze zlecenia. Opowiedz więcej o celu swojej pracy. Na swojej stronie deklarujesz, że działasz inaczej niż duże firmy. Powiedz czemu stawiasz się w opozycji do nich? Chodzi mi o podejście fair trade i ludzkie traktowanie pracowników. Jakbym mogła to cały czas tylko siedziałabym z nimi na miejscu i robiła wspólnie rzeczy. Zawsze będąc w Afryce czy Brazylii robię mnóstwo rzeczy na raz, ale jak najwięcej czasu chcę spędzać w warsztacie. Co ekscytuje Ciebie w tym, że Wasza komunikacja jest nieudolna? Podróże pomagają oderwać się od przyzwyczajeń, schematów myślowych, które usypiają czujność. Wyprawy stawiają nas w sytuacji niewygodnej, pozwalają zobaczyć rzeczy inaczej. Te buty to wynik komunikacji ludzi z dwóch diametralnie różnych kultur. Wyglądałyby inaczej gdybym pochodziła z miejsc gdzie działam, albo gdybym potrafiła płynnie mówić w języku suahili. Cieszę się, że szewc zaczął robić też te same buty dla społeczności Mathare, bo na co dzień zajmuje się wykonywaniem czarnych butów dla uczniów, które są elementem szkolnego mundurka. Do Rio pojechałam sama, bez wsparcia finansowego na zrealizowanie projektu. Spędziłam tam trzy miesiące i z wielu powodów było to trudne. Przeżyłam bardzo ekstremalne stany podczas moich podróży, często oznaczały walkę z własnymi słabościami. Oczywiście to by nie miało miejsca, gdybym przyjechała tam w celach jedynie turystycznych. Mimo tego, że dużo podróżuję, to szok kulturowy był duży i połączenie tych światów przez współpracę było trudne, ale intrygujące. To było jak lądowanie na innej planecie: nie znając języka, poruszałam się po niebezpiecznych miejscach. Prowadziłam warsztaty w trzech fawelach oraz w Muzeum de Arte Rio i w schronisku dla nastolatek. W fawele zostałam wprowadzona przez osoby stamtąd, przez „ludzi wzgórz”, bądź „ludzi betonu”, czyli z miasta, ale którzy znali kod poruszania się. Później zaczęłam robić to sama. Slumsy w Rio to ewenement w skali świata, bo znajdują się również w centrum miasta. Prawie każda fawela jest pilnowana przez inny gang narkotykowy. Wchodzi się przeważnie wąskimi schodami, a ich wejścia pilnują najczęściej niepełnoletni chłopcy ze spluwą i krótkofalówką. Pracują dla gangu, zwabieni łatwym zarobkiem. Krawcowa po naszym spotkaniu często odprowadzała mnie do wyjścia z faweli. Na szczęście nie miałam przykrych sytuacji, mimo, że nigdy nie widziałam takiej ilości broni w tak krótkim czasie i czasem czułam jak pot spływa mi po plecach. Twoje prace nie kończą zamknięte w galerii tylko mają bardzo namacalny wpływ na rzeczywistość, mają swoje dalsze życie. Powstają na styku kultur, które inaczej może by się nigdy nie spotkały. Co Cię pcha do takich działań? Miałam potrzebę postawienia się w ekstremalnej sytuacji, udowodnienia sobie własnych możliwości sprawczych na obcym gruncie. Było sporo ciężkich momentów, szczególnie w Brazylii, gdzie dopiero po miesiącu udało mi się zrobić pierwszy warsztat. Jest tam duża nieufność do ludzi spoza Brazylii czy spoza faweli. To dlatego, że jest dużo osób, które dostają grant i znikają nie kończąc projektu, zostawiając społeczność w tej samej sytuacji co przedtem. Mi udało się przeprowadzić warsztaty kaligrafii i praw człowieka, podczas których okazywało się, że ludzie nie wiedzą jakie mają podstawowe prawa, oraz wesprzeć działalność małego warsztatu krawieckiego w faweli. Ubrania można zamówić na stronie i fanpage'u oraz w galerii "Czułość" w Warszawie. Na zakup tych rzeczy prawie każdy może sobie pozwolić. Zdarzało się, że niektórzy stawiali buty na półce jako artefakt, a ja właśnie lubię kiedy są używane, schodzone, kiedy są w dialogu. To jest super, że ktoś je nosi, inni to widzą i może być to początek opowieści, która powędruje dalej. Można je zamawiać na wymiar na stronie i fanpage'u, a wybrane modele są dostępne w sklepie Amakuru w Warszawie na al. Solidarnośći 101. Dochód ze sprzedaży wspiera fundusz stypendialny Fundacji Razem Pamoja, która ma za cel zapewnienie nauki najlepszym uczniom ze slamsu Mathare w dobrych kenijskich liceach. Pracuję teraz nad następnym projektem, marzeniem które przyszło podczas pierwszego mojego przyjazdu do Nairobi, żeby stworzyć spółdzielnię pracy artystycznej w slamsie Mathare. Jest tam mnóstwo kobiet czy mężczyzn, którzy siedzą bezczynnie w domach i właśnie dla nich chciałabym dać możliwość udziału w warsztatach, gdzie będziemy się razem uczyć różnych rękodzielniczych technik, szycia, robienia na drutach, szydełku, wzorów na materiały. Będą uczyć miejscowe kobiety, które tam poznałam i cieszę się bardzo, że to da im możliwość uczciwego zarobku. Projekt realizuje w kolaboracji z Fundacją Razem Pamoja.    

READ MORE

Zamiast działać w pojedynkę, lub założyć firmę postawiły na współpracę opartą na horyzontalnym sposobie podejmowania decyzji, transparentności i szacunku do: środowiska, zwierząt i siebie nawzajem. Poznajcie: Emilię Oksentowicz, Dagmarę 'Dasię' Rolirad, Martę Żylis- założycielkę Te.ka, Natalię Faron, Kasię Głogowską- założycielkę Maszynowni i Anię Zawadzką.

READ MORE